• Lulled into the tranquil streets of South Kensington, the Catholic Oratory of order of St Philip Neri, dedicated to Immaculate Heart of Mary is an unusual sight for a church built in Britain. A composition of Neo-Classical styles was ordered as

  • Narrow streets of Central London shelter many small passages, shortcuts and secret alleys, winding through the courtyards and gates. Newer buildings built on such spots are planned to leave those urban pores intact. The trimmed corner of this building opens

  • The 310-ft tall, slender high-rise, looming over the Knightsbridge, is the central site of the barracks complex of “The Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment”. Members of the Household Division are senior members of the British Army. The cavalry members usually ride

  • The proximity of Tower Bridge and Tower of London, the difference in levels of street and the waterfront, and an overall eclectic collection of surrounding buildings do not make an easy plot for a new rise. Tower Bridge House, known

  • Best known as the center for royal weddings and burial place for greats such as Queen Elizabeth I, Charles Darwin, Geoffrey Chaucer, Charles Dickens, and Sir Isaac Newton, Westminster Abbey is much more than just that. Its history reaches deep

  • Chamfered and filleted corners seem a natural choice for the tight streets of the central London. Sometimes bound by regulations, new buildings are often deprived of the corner and the design possibilities it provides: to impose, lure and stand out. The

  • There is something formal in how postmodern architecture emphasizes classical architecture through new, ostensibly freer, architectural language. The Leadenhall Court building is one example. It's a corner edifice, and one of structured hierarchy. The floors are divided in sets of two,

  • The label “Britain’s ugliest building”, besides being frustrating for the architect, generates publicity. “Ugliest” is easy to remember, easy to find, and it becomes a kind of a landmark. The aesthetic values of the building are, of course, subjective and

  • Narrow streets of the medieval London city matrix were never meant to accommodate glass giants of modern architecture. To see the whole of Leadenhall Building, homonymous to the street it was built in, one has to step back and pick

  • Today overgrown by the surrounding new high-rises of the City, the Lloyd’s building was once much more exposed contour of the skyline. It might have not suited everyone’s taste but it was an unequivocal announcement of the new era for

  • 50 years ago, a structure like this one would be hard if not impossible to build. Built as a combination of rarely used structural systems, complex building geometry and sophisticated sustainable HVAC systems, it needed to be realized through the

  • “London’s worst kept secret” is the title of this building, positioned on the River Thames right bank in Vauxhall. The headquarters building of the Britain’s secret service is a flamboyant postmodern complex, a sight impossible to miss. On the other

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